Extended Call for Papers: AsianSIL 7th Biennial Conference 2019, Quezon City Philippines

EXTENDED DEADLINE for ABSTRACTS:
February 15, 2019

7th AsianSIL Biennial Conference
22 to 23 August 2019 (Quezon City, Philippines)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Theme of the Conference: Rethinking International Law: Finding Common Solutions to Contemporary Civilizational Issues from an Asian Perspective

Undeniably, the Asian region now plays a bigger role in the shaping of international law, as it continues to grow in economic, cultural and political importance. With more than half of the world’s population living in the region – not to mention that it plays host to ten of the largest nations on earth – Asian economies push the demands of development into unchartered territory in the so-called Asian century with a dynamism all their own.

And yet the past is always relevant to our common future/s. While international law may have had a murky beginning in Asia – closely intertwined as it has been with the colonial project – there is no question that Asian societies have embraced it, even for purposes distinct and separate from its original impulses. As a platform for cooperation in many areas, it has proven its usefulness, the contentious aspects notwithstanding.

Contemporary developments in international relations, shifts in global, regional and national politics, as well as large-scale environmental and economic issues, now compel a reexamination of the foundational roots of international law, especially as these raise civilizational issues.

For example, the horrific spectre raised by a new breed of radical terrorists has raised a common issue to humanity and challenges exceptionalist notions of culture-based norms and rights on what it means to be human and to be a rights-bearer.

East and West, North and South, the question of human dignity has become front and center in the raging debate on the meaning and continuing relevance of human rights; this in fact, should take us back to the discussions on the ontological or civilizational sources from which the drafters of the UN Charter drew in their difficult and gargantuan work. To be sure, Asia has its own smoldering human rights and humanitarian hotspots, which further complicate the direction of development its varied societies want to harness for their future.

And what of the UN in relation to Asia, the most diverse of regions in the world? As a leading, if dominant feature of the international legal order, the UN and the different corollary international legal institutions it has spawned have demonstrated both vertical and horizontal features that have a bearing on an Asian embrace of international law.

In the global issue of environmental degradation – on many levels a real civilizational threat – Asia has moved forward, with China choosing to work with the European Union in implementing the Paris Protocol in the face of American retreat. And environmental problems are no abstract problem in many Asian societies.

The hegemony of Western-style business and investments also now finds stiff competition in Chinese-led international banking and investments, and the new Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) proposed by China continues to make inroads in areas traditionally occupied by state sovereignty and extant regional economic arrangements.

Uncertainties in the contemporary times may mean disabling perplexities. But it may also be embraced as a necessary search for common solutions to the common problems faced by diverse cultures and societies, by way of rethinking what international law had stood for from the beginning and how it may be made relevant to contemporary challenges.

New Voices in International Law: The Junior Scholars’ Conference

There will also be a Junior Scholars’ Conference that will convene one day before the Biennial Conference, on 21 August 2019. This one-day conference encourages junior academics (untenured or within the first three years of a tenure track appointment), academic fellows (in pre-tenure track fellowships), post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students, to submit papers on the topics listed, or are related to what are listed, in the CFP for the main conference.

For further details, please click here.

The 7th Biennial Conference is co-hosted by the Philippine Society of International Law, the Department of Foreign Affairs, and the University of the Philippines College of Law/UP Law Center.

Visa and Relevant Information for the PSIL Inaugural Conference

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding seven (7) days, provided they hold valid tickets for their return journey to port of origin or next port of destination and their passports valid for a period of at least six (6) months beyond the contemplated period of stay:

1. Holders of Hong Kong Special Administrative (SAR) passports;
2. Holders of British National Overseas (BNO) passports;
3. Holders of Portuguese Passports issued in Macao;
4. Holders of Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) passports.

Nationals from the following countries are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a period of stay of twenty-one (21) days or less, provided they hold valid tickets for their return journey to port of origin or next port of destination and their passports valid for a period of at least six (6) months beyond the contemplated period of stay.The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding fifty-nine (59) days, provided they hold valid tickets for their return journey to port of origin or next port of destination and their passports valid for a period of at least six (6) months beyond the contemplated period of stay:

 

Andorra
Angola
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Benin
Bhutan
Bolivia
Botswana
Brazil*
Brunei DarussalamBulgaria
Burkina Faso

Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad
Chile
Colombia
Comoros
Congo
Costa Rica

Cote d’Ivoire

Cyprus
Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the

Congo
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fiji
Finland
France
Gabon
Gambia
Germany
Ghana
Gibraltar
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hungary
Iceland
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel*
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Kenya
Kiribati
Kuwait
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Latvia
Lesotho
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi

Malaysia
Maldives
Mali
Malta
Marshall IslandsMauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Micronesia
Monaco
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Namibia
Nepal
Netherlands
New Zealand

Nicaragua
Niger
Norway
Oman
Palau
Panama
Papua New Guinea

Paraguay
Peru
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Republic of Korea

Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa
San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Singapore
Slovakia
Slovenia
Solomon Islands

Somalia
South Africa

Spain
Suriname
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia
Turkey
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United Republic of Tanzania

United States of America

Uruguay
Venezuela
Vietnam
Zambia
Zimbabwe

  1. Holders of Brazil passports; and
  2. Holders of Israel passports.

Important Note:

Nationals who are subjects of deportation/blacklist orders of the Department and the Bureau of Immigration shall not be admitted to the Philippines.

Currency and Exchange Rates

The currency of the Philippines is the Philippine Peso.

The US$ Dollar to Peso exchange rate is at  Php 53.41 to US$ 1. Exchange rates will be subject to change depending on the conversion rate on date of check-out. Currency exchange is available at bank branches at the Manila Airport Terminal Lobby and in malls around Metro Manila. Currency conversion at hotels is available but generally at a lower currency exchange rate.

Registration for the PSIL National Conference opens

The registration period for the Philippine Society of International Law  Inaugural National Conference is from August 15-September 1, 2018.  The conference is expected to draw paper presenters from Hong Kong, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia and different parts of the Philippines. As the slots for non-paper presenters are limited, the PSIL Secretariat will accept applications for admission to the National Conference on a first-to-register basis.

Please email psil.secretariat (at) gmail.com with the subject hearing “National Conference Registration.” Also indicate if you are attending the Cocktail and Dinner Reception on the 6th of September.

The registration fee of Php 1,500.00 may be paid at the registration tables during  the Cocktail and Dinner Reception or the conference proper. Details of the conference program will be posted soon.
PSIL Conference 2018-01

Hotel and other relevant information for foreign and out-of-town participants

There is a hotel on campus, called the University Hotel. The accommodations are basic but  as it is only about five minutes on foot from the Malcolm Hall, the venue of the PSIL National Conference, it is very convenient. A yet cheaper option than the University Hotel is the  UP National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (NISMED) hostel, which is on another  part of the campus, and is a 15-minute walk to the venue, with more sights to see.

There are a couple of other accommodations on campus that may suit you.
Let us know beforehand  through the contact details provided if you intend to stay on campus, so we could help you make arrangements. 
For hotels outside the campus, we recommend the three nearest:
Microtel-Technohub (on another property owned by the university, across the Diliman campus crossing the Commonwealth Avenue, about 30 minutes’ worth of  brisk walking from the UP College of Law via Magsaysay Avenue and then Ylanan Road — though we don’t recommend this mode of traveling to and from the conference!)
And the Sulu Riviera Hotel  (the pricier option).
There’s also the Fersal Inn discount hotel on Kalayaan Avenue, which is very near the Maginhawa food strip (see below) as well as the Matalino food strip just behind city hall (and around a 100 meters away) from Sulu Riviera hotel. The last two hotels are in an area that is between 10-15 minutes away from the UP Campus by taxi or Grab.
Information on the UP Diliman Campus
The University Campus is quite big, at nearly 500 hectares.
There are several museums on campus, notably the UP Vargas Museum, which houses not a few art works from Filipino masters, and seven others that are worth checking out.
There is also a high-end mall on property owned by the University, called the UP Town Center.  It’s quite accessible;  in fact, it’s just a 10-minute leisurely walk from the conference venue. It features great shopping, food, coffee and bars.

More information on the UP Diliman Campus.

Restaurants on campus
While lunch and snacks will be provided at the conference, if you arrive a day or so before the conference and stay on campus, other than your hostel/hotel fare, you may want to try Cafe Via Mare at the Asian Center, which is a restaurant featuring contemporary Filipino cuisine.It is also very near the conference venue, right by the Magsaysay Avenue exit to Katipunan Avenue.
There are also the three restaurants at the UP Bahay ng Alumni (Alumni house) — Chocolate Kiss, ROC and Art Circle.
Too bad the UP Shopping Center burned down just months ago. It was the beehive of readily accessible options for  food, shopping and other services for faculty and students alike.
Outside campus, but nearby, you may also venture into the Maginhawa food strip,
You can take the ikot jeep going to Krus Na Ligas, (where the famous Sarah’s drinking hole is)  and from there, you can reach  Maginhawa after about 10 minutes of leisurely walking.

If you have culinary/eating restrictions, do let us know!

For visa requirement information, click here.